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Matt Illes, DDS, FICOI, FAGD

 

Contact Information
Matt Illes, DDS, FICOI, FAGD
Vancouver, British Columbia
Telephone: 604-734-4646
Website: www.drmatthewilles.com
Email: mji@drmatthewilles.com

Short Biography

Dr. Matt Illes is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario and serves as a Prosthodontic Consultant at the University of British Columbia. He is a fellow of both the Academy General Dentistry (AGD) and International Congress for Oral Implantologists. Dr. Illes has a private practice limited to prosthodontics and dental implants in Vancouver, B.C. He serves as current president of the British Columbia AGD, Regional Director of the AGD for Western Canada and a Director for the Vancouver and District Dental Society.

Presentations

1.

Course Title: Occlusion for Everyday Dentistry

Course Overview: The need to reappoint a patient to adjust the bite on a recently delivered restoration is time consuming, occasionally stressful and potentially detrimental to the health of a practice whenever multiple visits to correct the problem are necessary. Additional post-operative complications, such as porcelain chipping, can create unpleasant situations for the clinician to manage. The lecturer will review the occlusal methods which he employs to reduce the incidence of common post-operative issues in an effort to improve the predictability of restorative treatment. A clinical strategy for the maintenance of maximum intercuspation (MIP), in situations which permit for its preservation, will be provided using conventional instruments and materials. The presenter will also explain a clinical protocol to aid clinicians in their ability to recognize potentially hazardous, non-guiding, functional contacts into MIP. He will discuss the deleterious effects of these contacts including: constriction of the envelope of function, alteration of the envelope of function and initiation of biological or structural problems. The program will focus on typical scenarios faced by the clinician in their daily practices as pertains to the restoration of one or more teeth in MIP occlusion.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The speaker will demonstrate the value of mapping the preoperative occlusion in MIP, using shim stock in combination with articulating film, for the purpose of facilitating post-operative maintenance of MIP. Clinical strategies will be shown for the preservation of MIP for anterior and posterior restorations.
  2. The importance of body position during the occlusal adjustment of anterior restorations in MIP will be explored. A clinical strategy to minimize the risk of misdiagnosing an interference into MIP following a conventional supine MIP adjustment for an anterior restoration will be reviewed.
  3. A contemporary dynamic occlusal strategy to develop, or preserve, anterior guidance, premised on the chewing of food, will be compared and contrasted to the traditional Pankey-Dawson approach. The lecturer will provide attendees with systematic anterior and posterior protocols to assist in the identification and the adjustment of non-guiding, functional contacts into MIP to eliminate interferences on new restorations.
  4. The presenter will discuss the importance of evaluating the often underappreciated envelope of speech. An assessment of speech is the second element of the functional occlusal assessment for anterior restorations. The potential consequences of a new restoration violating the envelope of speech/function, or the more commonly referenced closest speaking space, will be communicated and a clinical strategy to prevent this impingement will be detailed.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic/Half Day - Full Day (3-7 hours)

2.

Course Title: Non-Immediate Loading and the Implant Overdenture

Course Overview: As the "All on 4" technique expands in both its fame and popularity amongst clinicians, greater numbers of patients in need of full arch implant rehabilitation are transitioning from their natural teeth to an immediate, fixed, provisional prosthesis. The ability to circumvent the traditional removable provisional phase of treatment is understandably highly desirable for both the patient and the clinician alike. Despite this shift in philosophy, there still remain situations for which the conventional removable approach for provisionalization may be more prudent. Similarly, there may be other scenarios where a permanent removable overdenture might offer an improved prognosis relative to a fixed prosthesis. The presenter will devote half his presentation time to highlight the steps required to develop an exceptional transitional maxillary denture and the remaining half of his presentation time to review a contemporary strategy for fabrication of an implant overdenture.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn all the steps necessary to fabricate a removable complete denture using a modern system. The presentation will feature: initial impressioning, diagnostic records, wax try-in, prosthesis delivery using a functional resin reline technique and final prosthesis delivery.
  2. Participants will learn a clinical protocol to maximize accuracy in impressioning multiple implants for a screw-retained, implant supported bar.
  3. The lecturer will demonstrate a clinical strategy which employs a verification jig for the purpose of evaluating the accuracy of the working model to improve the passivity of fit of the overdenture bar.
  4. The speaker will review a prosthodontic overdenture design which is capable of providing optimal esthetics, maximum strength and occlusal stability. The design will feature a foundation based upon a milled, titanium bar coupled with a cast, cobalt chromium substructure framework. The resultant overdenture will also feature milled, monolithic, zirconia posterior crowns to maintain the prosthesis occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) in lieu of traditional, cemented, gold alloy inlays/onlays.
  5. A CR occlusal strategy featuring an unconventional, functional assessment and adjustment of the overdenture in dynamic occlusion will be shown.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic /Half Day (3 hours)

3.

Course Title: Provisionalization to Develop Optimal Supragingival Contour for the Anterior Implant Crown

Course Overview: Temporization of an anterior implant incisor for the purpose of development of the soft tissues is widely used as a procedure to optimize the esthetic result for immediate and delayed/staged implants alike. The lecturer will review the clinical steps involved in achieving the above esthetic objective but will also explore the lesser-known functional benefits of anterior implant provisionalization. He will explain the importance of establishing both the incisal edge position and lingual contour of an anterior implant restoration through trial provisionalization to ensure that anterior guidance is developed/preserved and functional interference eliminated. The speaker will review the impact which the contours of occlusion can potentially impart on a clinician's decision pertaining to restoration design, material and construction technique.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand the benefits of incorporating a provisional crown phase in the process of restoring a single unit anterior implant to develop and optimize the functional and esthetics elements of the final restoration.
  2. To learn an indirect clinical technique utilizing impressioning in combination with a dental laboratory for constructing a provisional anterior crown.
  3. To learn multiple direct clinical techniques, with and without prefabricated crown forms, for constructing a provisional anterior crown.
  4. The lecturer will explain and demonstrate a contemporary clinical method for adjusting the occlusion on a provisional anterior crown. Attendees with be provided with a systematic protocol to maintain maximum intercuspation (MIP) and identify/adjust functional contacts into MIP to reduce the risk of constricting the envelope of function.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic/Half Day - Full Day (3-7 hours)

4.

Course Title: Building the Ultimate Screw-Retained Implant Bridge - Using A Prototype for Success

Course Overview: The use of dental cements in implant prosthodontics has received considerable attention in recent times prompting many within the profession to alter their philosophies to limit the use of cement-retained restorations to situations not appropriate for screw-retained design. The use of the screw-retained prosthesis has eliminated the potential issue related to peri-implantitis resulting from of undetectable residual cement, however, it has in turn has created new challenges. One such challenge is the fabrication of a 'passive' fitting prosthesis when multiple implants are being splinted. Clinicians may opt to transition from an impression appointment directly to a try-in and potential delivery appointment of the permanent prosthesis in an effort to minimize their chair time and overhead costs. Although the latter strategy is certainly alluring, it can unfortunately yield undesirable and unnecessary complications. The speaker will review the advantages of employing an intermediary step for the purpose of copy milling a screw-retained implant prosthesis. He will explore the use of a full contour, screw-retained acrylic jig, or provisional screw-retained prosthesis, to optimize the final prosthetic results of treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  1. A clinical protocol demonstrating the construction and clinical application of both an acrylic copy mill jig and a provisional screw-retained implant prosthesis will be provided.
  2. The presenter will examine the benefits of a contemporary permanent, hybrid style, screw-retained implant prosthesis. A screw-retained splinted framework designed to support individual cementable crowns, in lieu of the conventional unibody of feldspathic porcelain, will be discussed.
  3. Attendees will learn the benefits and limitations of the various CAD/CAM materials available for milling of a screw-retained implant framework as well as the leading contemporary materials for use as individual cementable crowns
  4. The lecturer will review a clinical strategy to evaluate and deliver a screw-retained implant prosthesis. A section on crown cementation to minimize the risk of peri-implantitis will be included to address this controversial topic.
  5. An unconventional occlusal strategy, as pertains to the delivery of the hybrid prosthesis, in a common practice scenario whereby sufficient teeth exist to permit the use of maximum intercuspation (MIP) occlusion, will be discussed.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic/Full Day (7 hours)

5.

Course Title: Contemporary Restoration of the Non-Immediate Anterior Implant

Course Overview: Replacement of an anterior tooth using a dental implant has evolved greatly over the past decade. Immediate implant placement and immediate temporization has gained rapid acceptance and increased in popularity with clinicians. The proposed benefits of this approach range from reduced treatment time and costs to potentially improved soft tissue esthetic outcomes. Despite this shift in treatment philosophy there is still a great need to restoratively manage the anterior single tooth replacement using a staged approach. One of the challenges associated with the latter is the difficulty redeveloping the peri-implant soft tissue contours. The lecturer will review a clinical protocol for production and delivery of a non-immediate, anterior implant crown. Highlights will include provisionalization, CAD/CAM technology and modern materials for both screw-retained and cement-retained restorations.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The speaker will explore the science to support the current trend for immediate implant replacement of an anterior tooth.
  2. To understand the benefits of incorporating a provisional crown phase in the process of restoring an anterior implant to optimize both the esthetic and functional elements of treatment.
  3. To learn both indirect and direct clinical techniques for constructing a provisional anterior crown.
  4. The presenter will demonstrate clinical techniques to transfer the subgingival and supragingival contours of the provisional crown to the permanent restoration.
  5. A review of the current techniques and materials available to transfer the provisional contours will be discussed for both screw-retained and cement-retained permanent restorations.
  6. o A contemporary clinical method for adjusting the occlusion for an anterior crown will be demonstrated. Participants with be provided with a systematic protocol to maintain maximum intercuspation (MIP) and identify/adjust functional contacts into MIP to reduce the risk of constricting the envelope of function.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic/Full Day (7 hours)

6.

Course Title: Occlusal Veneers - Ultraconservative Treatment for Certain…But is it Predictable?

Course Overview: The profession has bore witness to many marked changes in recent times. None of these changes can claim to have a more dramatic impact than that of esthetic dentistry. The invention of bonding and use of bondable materials has been the catalyst responsible for the movement away from traditional restorative dentistry and its associated requirement for excessive tooth preparation. Although the face of esthetic dentistry has long been anterior facial veneers, it can be postulated that posterior occlusal veneers have been garnishing more attention in recent years. The use of featureless, unretentive occlusal veneers to restore the posterior dentition, in lieu of the full crown or traditional class 2 onlay, may have been first exposed to the profession in 2002 courtesy of Pascal Magne. However, little information has been published since that time to support their use and equally scant information is available to validate the array of clinical approaches to their application. The presenter will attempt to demystify this intriguing area of dentistry using science to affirm and/or refute the common believes about occlusal veneers.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The presenter will provide an unbiased report of the literature available to support the use of occlusal veneers.
  2. Contemporary material options for occlusal veneers will be discussed. Material assets/liabilities will be explored.
  3. Clinical strategies detailing the process of fabricating an occlusal veneer will be shown inclusive of all procedures ranging from tooth preparation to provisionalization to bonding of the permanent restoration. Limitations and challenges associated with the spectrum of treatment will be addressed.
  4. A strategy to maintain maximum intercuspation occlusion (MIP) and therefore maximize the survival of occlusal veneers will be demonstrated.
  5. Potential complications with occlusal veneers will be highlighted.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic /Half Day (3 hours) with Option to Expand to Full Day (7 Hours)

7.

Course Title: The 6 Sextant Approach to Complete Rehab - Reversing the Mindset of Treatment

Course Overview: The full mouth rehabilitation patient presents a dizzying collection of challenges for the beginner as well as formidable challenges to the experienced practitioner. Typical issues include the necessity to be able to prepare, impress and temporize a full arch at a high standard in one appointment and a patient's ability to comfortably tolerate the duration of time required to do so. The potential complications associated with traditional full mouth rehabilitation are many and undoubtedly pose greater issues to those whom are inexperienced or possess minimal experience. The speaker will present an uncommon segmentalized solution to full mouth reconstruction in a strategy which serves to: offer enhanced control, improved predictability and reduced complications with the added benefit of decreased stress to both the clinician and patient. This protocol can be argued to represent the antithesis of contemporary restorative dentistry which too often appears to have a greater focus on the speed of treatment as opposed to the quality of treatment.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The attendee will learn the benefits of a sextant approach to the full mouth reconstruction patient relative to the traditional, full arch approach.
  2. The speaker will explore the premier restorative materials available and discuss their assets and liabilities.
  3. Participants will learn the clinical application of the segmentalized protocol. This will include controlled tooth preparation using both burs of a known dimension and a bonded, bis-acrylic, provisional preparation guide. Attendees will learn the importance of the face as it relates to the development of a customized wax-up and, in turn, the construction of the provisional preparation guide.
  4. Registrants will understand the benefits of developing optimal provisional restorations to establish the final occlusal vertical dimension (OVD), esthetics and centric relation occlusion (CRO). The presenter will explain the methodology employed to copy/transfer the OVD, esthetic contours and occlusion developed and subsequently tested with the temporary restorations.
  5. The lecturer will review a protocol to maintain CRO and OVD during the process of constructing and delivering the permanent crown restorations in order to minimize any unnecessary complications related to treatment.

Intended Audience or Format:

  1. General practitioners and specialists primarily. Dental assistants and hygienists will also benefit from the presentation and are invited to attend.
  2. Didactic /Half Day (3 hours) with Option to Expand to Full Day (7 Hours

Alumni Speakers